OG BETTY: SKATEBOARDING QUEEN

Patti McGee grew up in the San Diego surfing scene of the 60’s.  During this time Surfing is what was up! But when the surf was low skateboarding entered her life and her life will forever be changed from that point on.  What started as a hobby and something to stay occupied while not surfing, turned into much more when she won the 1964 Woman’s National Championship.

Patti is the first ever female professional skateboarder and first female inductee in the Skateboarding Hall of Fame, sometimes referred to as the skateboarding queen.  Patti set the world record for the fastest girl on a skateboard at 47mph during Dick Clark's World Teen Fair 1964 held at the Orange County (CA) Fair Grounds.

Patti graced the cover of LIFE magazine in 1965 along with the cover of the 4th issue of SKATEBOARDER mag.  She also made numerous TV & movie appearances including being a guest on the Johnny Carson Show.

Today, ORIGINAL BETTY captures the very essence of her legacy that was a key part in what makes skateboarding what it is today.  With a mesh of old and new, it’s a style that recognizes how far the industry in all extreme sports has come.
 

 

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Source: http://ogbetty.com/portfolio/patti-mcgee-t...

CHAMPION FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

"Sports teaches you character, it teaches you to play by the rules, it teaches you to know what it feels like to win and lose - it teaches you about life." - BILLIE JEAN KING

 

In 1990 Life Magazine named Billie Jean King one of the 100 most important Americans of the 20th Century.  Only three other athletes, Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson and Muhammad Ali, made the list.

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With 39 Grand Slam titles to her name, including a record 20 titles at Wimbledon, Billie Jean King is one of the greatest tennis players of all time. She held the world #1 ranking in women’s tennis for six of the ten years from 1966 through 1975.

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Known for her lightning-fast speed, forceful net game, and fierce backhand, Billie Jean’s tennis championship titles are only half her story.

Off the court, Billie Jean campaigned for equal prize money in the men’s and women’s games. In 1970, she joined the Virginia Slims Tour for women, and in 1971, King became the first woman athlete to earn over $100,000 in prize money. Yet when she won the U.S. Open in 1972, she received $15,000 less than the men’s champion,Ilie Năstase.

In 1973, at the height of her competitive years, Billie Jean leveraged her position to spearhead the formation of the Women’s Tennis Association and became its first president. She lobbied for equal prize money for men and women at the U.S. Open, and a sponsor was found to level the playing field. The U.S. Open became the first major tournament to offer equal prize money to both sexes.

Read more about the amazing work she continues to do for women in sports here.

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"When they take surveys of women in business, of the Fortune 500, the successful women, 80% of them, say they were in sports as a young woman." - BILLIE JEAN KING

American tennis player Billie Jean King plays at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon in London on July 8, 1967. (AP)

American tennis player Billie Jean King plays at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon in London on July 8, 1967. (AP)


Billie Jean King raises her arms after defeating Bobby Riggs, in the 'Battle of the Sexes' at the Houston Astrodome in 1973.

Billie Jean King raises her arms after defeating Bobby Riggs, in the 'Battle of the Sexes' at the Houston Astrodome in 1973.

Houston, Sept. 20 - So now we know. When it comes to tennis, a 29-year-old at the height of her game can beat a 55-year-old man, many years past his prime. In the span of only two hours and five minutes, Billie Jean King freed all the women in chains, undermined the entire vitamin and avocado industry and severely battered the reputation of the world’s No. 1 hustler, Robert Larimore Riggs.

Playing with all the caution of a Kamikaze pilot and all the femininity of a roller derby star, Billie Jean routed Bad Bob in straight sets, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3, to win the Super Bowl of the Sexes, $20,000, and a front-row ticket to the next Bobby Riggs promotion - The Happy Hustler vs. the Pacific Ocean.
— NY DAILY NEWS
Source: https://www.amazon.com/Outstanding-Women-A...

PRO BOWLERS

Hall of Fame bowler Aleta Sill is the only bowler in history to win the career Triple Crown twice. The women's Triple Crown consisted of the U.S. Open, WIBC (now USBC) Queens, and the Sam's Town Invitational. In 1999, Sill also became the first woman to crack the $1 million mark in career earnings on the women's pro bowling tour.

A million dollars in prize money is impressive, but when it's spread across 21 years on tour, you learn to temper your splurges.

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Marion Ladewig, recognized as the greatest woman bowler of all time, was a dominating performer in women's bowling from the mid-1940s until her retirement in 1963. The Bowling Writers' Association of America voted her Bowler of the Year nine times from 1950-63 and in a 1973 poll she was named the 'Greatest of all Time.'

Marion Ladweig, Courtesy of the International Bowling Museum and Hall of Fame.

Marion Ladweig, Courtesy of the International Bowling Museum and Hall of Fame.

101!

“I feel really good winning all four gold medals, and this is not it, I will come back and compete again at the Master Games 2020 in Japan,” MAN KAUR told the Indian Weekender.

 

Man Kaur is living proof that age is just a number.

The 101-year-old from Chandigarh, India, has made history at this year's World Masters Games in Auckland, New Zealand, as the oldest female athlete to win a gold medal in the 100-meter race.

She's the oldest athlete at the multi-sport event, which has been labeled by many as the Olympics for veterans. Held every four years, the World Masters Games is for people of varying abilities who are, generally, age 35 or over.

Read more here.

But did Man Kaur even give it her all? The Times of India quoted her son, Gurdev Singh, as saying, “Mother could have run faster.”

But did Man Kaur even give it her all? The Times of India quoted her son, Gurdev Singh, as saying, “Mother could have run faster.”

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/25/sport/101-ye...

BEST TENNIS PLAYER EVER

Whoever said, "It's not whether you win or lose that counts," probably lost. - MARTINA NAVRATILOVA

The enormity of Martina Navratilova’s career places her atop the list when tennis historians debate which player – male or female – is the best of all time. When one of her closest competitors Billie Jean King says that Navratilova is “the greatest singles, doubles, and mixed doubles player who ever lived,” it’s hard not to take those words at face value. It’s not that Navratilova doesn’t have competitors in King, Helen Wills, Margaret Court, Chris Evert, Steffi Graf, and Serena Williams, but statistically she’s off the charts.

Read more here.

Navratilova holds the records for most singles (167) and doubles titles (177) in the open era. Her record as No.1 in singles (1982–86) remains the most dominant in professional tennis to date.

Navratilova holds the records for most singles (167) and doubles titles (177) in the open era. Her record as No.1 in singles (1982–86) remains the most dominant in professional tennis to date.

Source: https://www.tennisfame.com/hall-of-famers/...

TITLE IX

"No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." - TITLE IX

 

As a young woman with a passion for education, Bernice Sandler (known to her friends as Bunny) entered the University of Maryland in the 1960s with an expectation of earning her doctoral degree and teaching.  Smart, motivated and committed, Dr. Sandler had done well in her PhD program, and she was excited about the prospects of what lay ahead as she approached graduation.  What she had not seen coming after teaching part time while earning her degree was a consistent rejection of her qualifications when she applied for jobs.  Puzzled by the fact that although multiple positions were available in her own department, no effort was made to extend her a job offer, Dr. Sandler asked her department chair.  He told her bluntly that she was being passed over because she "came on too strong for a woman."

The expression "too strong for a woman" was code for the reluctance male faculty and administrators felt in terms of hiring women in the 1960s.  Viewing female candidates as less qualified and less committed, prone to putting marriage and family before job, and disruptive to all-male faculties, the routine dismissal of female applicants for positions in higher education was a standard practice.  It was this rejection that led Dr. Sandler to become the country's leading authority on sex discrimination in schools. 

Working at a time when there were few reports on the status of women in education, she built the initial case for why this form of discrimination was damaging to the women involved and to society overall.  This concept of sex discrimination was so new, in fact, that the culture had yet to develop a vocabulary to adequately convey that women were being accorded second-class status in a democracy that prided itself on fair and equal treatment of its citizens.  

What strikes us as unbelievable today in the United States and other Western cultures was accepted practice in the years leading up to the passage of Title IX.  Girls were required to meet higher grade and test score thresholds in order to get into college and professional schools than boys.  Colleges and universities maintained admission quotas to ensure that only so many women would receive a higher education.  Greater amounts of financial aid were awarded to men regardless of whether women were more qualified.  Women were disqualified as applicants for jobs in education simply because they were women.

Read more in Women and Sport: From Liberation to Celebration by Staurowsky, Ellen J.

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Title IX, the law of the land since 1972, made no mention of sports. Its 37 words just say that no educational institution or activity receiving any federal money can discriminate against or deny benefits to anyone on the basis of sex. Gender hadn’t been part of the civil rights laws of the 1960s, and so a woman named Bernice Sandler, who’d felt that gender discrimination in her own career, worked with Reps. Patsy Mink and Edith Green and Sen. Birch Bayh to leverage President Lyndon Johnson’s executive order on gender and hiring into a federal law.

Title IX’s effect on virtually every aspect of campus life — college demographics, scholarships, and of course girls’ and women’s sports — has been nothing short of stupendous.

How is this relevant today?  Read more here.

Source: http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-ol...

MIA HAMM

"I've worked too hard and too long to let anything stand in the way of my goals. I will not let my teammates down and I will not let myself down." - MIA HAMM

Legendary U.S. striker Mia Hamm is responsible in large part for the surge in popularity women's soccer experienced in America in the 1990's. She led Team USA to its historic win at the 1999 Women's World Cupand was named the Women's FIFA World Player of the Year the first two years the award was given.

Until 2013, Hamm held the record for most international goals scored by any player, male or female, in the history of soccer with 159. She has been inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

ESPN commentator and former sportswriter for the Washington Post Michael Wilbon called her, "Perhaps the most important athlete of the last 15 years."

Mia Hamm held the record for most international goals scored—by a woman or man—until 2013 and remains in third place behind former teammate Abby Wambach and Canadian striker Christine Sinclair as of 2017

Mia Hamm held the record for most international goals scored—by a woman or man—until 2013 and remains in third place behind former teammate Abby Wambach and Canadian striker Christine Sinclair as of 2017

Source: https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/greatest-...

DOGSLEDDING

She spent 87 hours in temperatures plunging to -50 degrees, tended sled dogs who needed emergency rations, and endured blizzards so bad that the competition had to be stopped twice so the competitors could take shelter. LIBBY RIDDLES earned her place in history the hard way — by being the first woman to win the Iditarod — the 1,100-mile trans-Alaska dog sled race often referred to as “The Last Great Race on Earth.”

Women make up nearly a third of the entries in the 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, considered one of the toughest endurance competitions in the world. Proportionally, top-ten Iditarod finishes between women and men are often an even split.

  • Libby Riddles was the first woman to win the Alaskan dogsled race, the Iditarod, in 1985. She mushed her 13-dog team over 1,100 miles across Alaska's ice fields and snowcapped mountains. It took her just over 18 days to make this grueling trek though blinding blizzards.
  • Susan Butcher, the most famous female dogsled musher in the world, was a four-time winner of the Iditarod. She won the race in 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1990. She was named outstanding woman athlete of the world in 1989.
  • Deedee Jonrowe has both the fastest time of any woman in the history of the Iditarod and 13 top 10 finishes in her career. In her most recent Iditarod in 2006, she placed fourth with a time of 9 d 16 h 25 m 50 s.
Champion Libby Riddles finishes first with her champion dogs. (Photo: Official site of Libby Riddles)

Champion Libby Riddles finishes first with her champion dogs. (Photo: Official site of Libby Riddles)

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/14/sports/...

HORSE RACING

"A horse doesn't know whether the rider on his back wears a dress or pants away from the track." - DIANE CRUMP

 

The first woman jockey was Alicia Meynell of England. She first competed in a four-mile race in York, England, in 1804.  Women were involved with horse racing in Australia by the 1890s. Since then, they have owned horses, trained horses, gambled on horses and attended the races. Their participation in the sport was hampered because of a lack of facilities and participation rates were not as high as other sports.   

Key milestones for women in horse racing follow:

  • In 1970 Diane Crump became the first female jockey to ride in the Kentucky Derby, the biggest thoroughbred race of the year.  A Derby win may have eluded her, but she scored more than 230 victories on track before leaving the sport in 1985. 
  • Julie Krone was the first female jockey to ride in the Belmont Stakes, which is part of racing's Triple Crown. She rode in 1991. Krone briefly retired in 1999 from horseracing. She returned in 2003 to win the Breeder’s Cup race, becoming the first female rider to do so.

 

Diane Crump (born 1948) is an American jockey and horse trainer. Crump was the first woman to ride in a pari-mutuel race in the United States; her participation in the event was so contested that she required a full police escort through the crowds at the Hialeah Park Race Track.[3] She went on to be the first woman to ride in the Kentucky Derby. 

Diane Crump (born 1948) is an American jockey and horse trainer. Crump was the first woman to ride in a pari-mutuel race in the United States; her participation in the event was so contested that she required a full police escort through the crowds at the Hialeah Park Race Track.[3] She went on to be the first woman to ride in the Kentucky Derby

1900 OLYMPIC GAMES

The first time for female athletes to participate in the modern Olympic Games was the second Olympic Games in 1900. Only free male Greek citizens were allowed to participate in the 1st modern Olympic Games as well as the ancient Olympic Games.

According to the IOC (International Olympic Committee), only 12 female athletes participated in the second Olympic Games out of the 1066 athletes from 19 countries. They competed in only two events which were golf and tennis. In the 3rd St. Louis Olympics, archery was the only women's event.  In the 4th London Olympics, archery, figure skating, and tennis became women's events, and diving, swimming and tennis in the 5th Stockholm Olympics. 

Read about more key dates for women in the history of the Olympic movement here.

Charlotte Cooper Sterry (née Charlotte Reinagle Cooper, 22 September 1870 – 10 October 1966) was a female tennisplayer from England who won five singles titles at the Wimbledon Championships and in 1900 became Olympic champion. In winning in Paris on july 11th 1900, she became the first female Olympic tennis champion as well as the first individual female Olympic champion.

Charlotte Cooper Sterry (née Charlotte Reinagle Cooper, 22 September 1870 – 10 October 1966) was a female tennisplayer from England who won five singles titles at the Wimbledon Championships and in 1900 became Olympic champion. In winning in Paris on july 11th 1900, she became the first female Olympic tennis champion as well as the first individual female Olympic champion.

Source: http://www.juntendo.ac.jp/athletes/en/hist...

BICYCLE FACE

"Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel." - SUSAN B. ANTHONY

It is hard to imagine that a little over a century ago, women were discouraged from riding their bicycles. In the late 19th century, medical professionals  made up a disease called ‘Bicycle Face’ to discourage women from cycling. The increasing availability of cycles brought women mobility and the independence to travel alone. This of course threatened the male hegemony.

The solution was to scare women into believing that riding bicycles would cause their eyes to bulge, and their chins to jut out due to the strain to keep their balance on the bikes. These were considered undesirable female features.  Read more here.

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Source: http://blog.europeana.eu/2014/07/women-bew...